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Evaluating Social Norms and Social Marketing Campaigns for Sexual and Domestic Violence Prevention


Social norms and social marketing campaigns aim to influence target audiences’ attitudes and behaviors to improve public health outcomes. In the sexual and domestic violence prevention field, there has been limited rigorous research focused specifically on evaluating social norms and social marketing campaigns. However, many lessons learned form evaluating other campaigns focused on different public health issues can be applied. This web conference will define social norms and social marketing campaigns, describe appropriate evaluation measures and indicators (including their pros and cons) to measure the efficacy of these campaigns, and provide examples of how several social norms and social marketing campaigns have been evaluated. This web conference builds off concepts and definitions from a previous PreventConnect web conference “
Clearing Up Social Norms Change and Social Marketing for Sexual and Domestic Violence Prevention.”

OBJECTIVES

  • Describe key concepts and principles for evaluating social norms change and social marketing campaigns
  • Identify evaluation approaches, measures, and indicators for social norms change and social marketing campaigns
  • Discuss examples of ways to evaluate social norms change and social marketing campaigns

MATERIALS:

  • Web Conference PowerPoint slides [PDF]
  • Resource list [PDF]
  • Text Chat transcript [PDF]

HOSTS/FACILITATORS: Tori VandeLinde & Ashleigh Klein Jimenez, PreventConnect and CALCASA

GUESTS:

  • Patrick Cook, Communications Specialist, Violence Prevention Technical Assistance Center (VPTAC)
  • Sally Laskey, Evaluation Coordinator, National Sexual Violence Resource Center
  • Maury Nation, Vanderbilt University

One response to “Evaluating Social Norms and Social Marketing Campaigns for Sexual and Domestic Violence Prevention”

  1. This webinar was super informative, I especially like the piece about the community blocking the liquor licence in the local Family Dollar store. It displayed the power of community.

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